Alliance A031902

This randomized, placebo-controlled phase III trial is evaluating the benefit of rucaparib and enzalutamide combination therapy versus enzalutamide alone for the treatment of men with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and has become resistant to testosterone-deprivation therapy (castration-resistant). Enzalutamide helps fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of testosterone by the tumor cells for growth. Poly adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, such as rucaparib, fight prostate cancer by prevent tumor cells from repairing their DNA. Giving enzalutamide and rucaparib may make patients live longer or prevent their cancer from growing or spreading for a longer time, or both. It may also help doctors learn if a mutation in any of the homologous recombination DNA repair genes is helpful to decide which treatment is best for the patient.

ECOG-ACRIN EA8171

This phase II trial studies how well multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) works in evaluating cancer stage and helping treatment planning in patients with prostate cancer. Multiparametric MRI may be useful for evaluating the type of cancer in finding aggressive disease.

ECOG-ACRIN EA8183

This phase III trial compares the effect of adding darolutamide to ADT versus ADT alone after surgery for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer. ADT reduces testosterone levels in the blood. Testosterone is a hormone made mainly in the testes and is needed to develop and maintain male sex characteristics, such as facial hair, deep voice, and muscle growth. It also plays role in prostate cancer development. Darolutamide blocks the actions of the androgens (e.g. testosterone) in the tumor cells and in the body. Giving darolutamide with ADT may work better in eliminating or reducing the size of the cancer and/or prevent it from returning compared to ADT alone in patients with prostate cancer.

ECOG-ACRIN EA8191

This phase III trial compares the addition of apalutamide, with or without targeted radiation therapy, to standard of care treatment versus standard of care treatment alone in patients with prostate cancer biochemical recurrence (a rise in the blood level of prostate-specific antigen [PSA] after treatment with surgery or radiation). Diagnostic procedures, such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), may help doctors look for cancer that has spread to the pelvis. Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Apalutamide may help fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of androgens by the tumor cells. Targeted radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors that have spread. This trial may help doctors determine if using PET/CT results to deliver more tailored treatment (i.e., adding apalutamide, with or without targeted radiation therapy, to standard of care treatment) works better than standard of care treatment alone in patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer.

NRG-GU002

This randomized phase II / III trial studies docetaxel, antiandrogen therapy, and radiation therapy to see how well it works compared with antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy alone in treating patients with prostate cancer that has been removed by surgery. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cells. Antihormone therapy may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy with or without docetaxel after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells.

NRG-GU005

This randomized phase III trial studies how well stereotactic body radiation therapy works compared to intensity-modulated radiation therapy in treating patients with stage IIA-B prostate cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Stereotactic body radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.

NRG-GU008 – Temporarily Closed

This phase III trial studies whether adding apalutamide, abiraterone acetate, and prednisone to the usual treatment improves outcome in patients with lymph node positive prostate cancer after surgery. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-ray to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Androgens, or male sex hormones, can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Drugs, such as apalutamide, may help stop or reduce the growth of prostate cancer cell growth by blocking the attachment of androgen to its receptors on cancer cells, a mechanism similar to stopping the entrance of a key into its lock. Abiraterone acetate blocks some of the enzymes needed for androgen production and may cause the death of prostate cancer cells dependent on androgen for their growth. Prednisone may help abiraterone acetate work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drug. Adding apalutamide and abiraterone acetate with prednisone to the usual hormone therapy and radiation therapy after surgery may stabilize prostate cancer and prevent it from spreading and extend time without disease spreading compared to the usual approach.

NRG-GU009 – Temporarily Closed

This phase III trial compares less intense hormone therapy and radiation therapy to usual hormone therapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with high risk prostate cancer and low gene risk score. This trial also compares more intense hormone therapy and radiation therapy to usual hormone therapy and radiation therapy in patients with high risk prostate cancer and high gene risk score. Abiraterone acetate may help fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of testosterone made by the body. Apalutamide may help fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of androgen by the tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving a shorter hormone therapy treatment may work the same at controlling prostate cancer compared to the usual 24 month hormone therapy treatment in patients with low gene risk score. Adding abiraterone acetate and apalutamide to the usual treatment may increase the length of time without prostate cancer spreading as compared to the usual treatment in patients with high gene risk score.

SWOG S1802

This phase III trial studies whether the addition of definitive treatment (radiation or surgical removal) of the primary tumor to standard systemic therapy for patients with prostate cancer, may help prevent the cancer from the spreading to other parts of their body. Removing the prostate by either surgery or radiation therapy in addition to standard systemic therapy for prostate cancer may lower the chance of the cancer growing or spreading.

Wake Forest WF-1802

The objective of this study is to examine how adenocarcinoma of the prostate treatment differentially affects African American men's ability to work and to describe and compare changes in work ability (as measured through self-reported global work ability item) reported by African American and white adenocarcinoma of the prostate survivors before treatment and 6 months after treatment completion. Participants will receive a $30, $20, and $20 gift card after administration of the first, second, and third Structured Questionnaires, respectively. Participants will receive gifts cards to a retailer such as Wal-Mart in electronic or physical format.