AGCT1531

This phase III trial studies how well active surveillance, bleomycin, etoposide, carboplatin or cisplatin work in treating pediatric and adult patients with germ cell tumors. Active surveillance may help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors after their tumor is removed. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The trial studies whether carboplatin or cisplatin is the preferred chemotherapy to use in treating germ cell tumors.

AGCT1532

Bleomycin, Etoposide, Cisplatin (BEP) administered 3-weekly x 4 remains standard 1st line chemotherapy for intermediate- and poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumours (GCTs). Cure rates are over 90% for good-risk disease, 85% with intermediate-risk, and about 70% for poor-risk disease. Previous strategies to improve first-line chemotherapy have failed to improve cure rates and were more toxic than BEP. New strategies are needed for patients with intermediate and poor-risk disease. BEP is accelerated by cycling Cisplatin and etoposide 2-weekly instead of 3-weekly. The Australian and New Zealand Urogenital and Prostate Cancer Trials Group (ANZUP) is conducting a trial comparing accelerated BEP with standard BEP. The aim of this study is to determine if accelerated BEP is superior to standard BEP as first-line chemotherapy for intermediate and poor risk metastatic GCTs. Primary arising in testis, ovary, retro-peritoneum, or mediastinum

NRG-CC008

This trial studies how well two surgical procedures (bilateral salpingectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy) work in reducing the risk of ovarian cancer for women with BRCA1 mutations. Bilateral salpingectomy involves the surgical removal of fallopian tubes, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy involves the surgical removal of both the fallopian tubes and ovaries. This study may help doctors determine if the two surgical procedures are nearly the same for ovarian cancer risk reduction for women with BRCA1 mutations.

NRG-GY012

This randomized phase II trial studies how well olaparib, cediranib maleate, and Wee1 inhibitor AZD1775 work in treating patients with endometrial cancer that has come back, does not respond to treatment, or has spread to other places in the body. Olaparib, cediranib maleate, and Wee1 inhibitor AZD1775 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NRG-GY018

This phase III trial studies how well the combination of pembrolizumab, paclitaxel and carboplatin, works compared with paclitaxel and carboplatin alone in treating patients with endometrial cancer that is stage III or IV, or has come back (recurrent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Paclitaxel and carboplatin are chemotherapy drugs used as part of the usual treatment approach for this type of cancer. This study aims to assess if adding immunotherapy to these drugs is better or worse than the usual approach for treatment of this cancer.

NRG-GY019

This phase III trial studies how well letrozole with or without paclitaxel and carboplatin works in treating patients with stage II-IV low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary or peritoneum. Letrozole is an enzyme inhibitor that lowers the amount of estrogen made by the body which in turn may stop the growth of tumor cells that need estrogen to grow. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving letrozole alone or in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin works better in treating patients with low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary or peritoneum compared to paclitaxel and carboplatin without letrozole.

NRG-GY022

This trial studies how well iohexol works in helping doctors calculate the dose of carboplatin given to patients with cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Understanding how to best calculate the dose of carboplatin given to patients with cancer may help doctors learn how to improve the use of carboplatin in the future.

NRG-GY023

This phase II trial studies the possible benefits of treatment with different combinations of the drugs durvalumab, olaparib and cediranib vs. the usual treatment in patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer that has come back after a period of improvement with platinum therapy (recurrent platinum resistant). Usual treatment is the type of treatment most patients with this condition receive if they are not part of a clinical study. Combination therapies studied in this trial include MEDI4736 (durvalumab) plus olaparib and cediranib, durvalumab and cediranib, or olaparib and cediranib. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumors cells to grow and spread. Olaparib is an inhibitor of PARP, an enzyme that helps repair deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) when it becomes damaged. Blocking PARP may help keep cancer cells from repairing their damaged DNA, causing them to die. PARP inhibitors are a type of targeted therapy. Cediranib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking VEGF (an enzyme). needed for cell growth. Giving different combinations of durvalumab, olaparib and cediranib may work better in increasing the duration of time that the cancer does not progress compared to the usual treatment.

NRG-GY024

Patient Population: Early stage vulvar cancer with macrometastasis and/or extracapsular extension in the SLN.  The primary objective of this study is to investigate the safety of replacing inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy by chemoradiation in early-stage vulvar cancer patients with a macrometastasis (>2mm) and/or extracapsular extension in the Sentinel Lymph Node (SLN). The secondary objective is to evaluate the short and long-term morbidity associated with the SLN procedure and chemoradiation.

NRG-GY026

This phase II/III trial tests whether adding trastuzumab and hyaluronidase-oysk (Herceptin HylectaTM) or pertuzumab, trastuzumab and hyaluronidase-zzxf (PhesgoTM) to the usual chemotherapy (paclitaxel and carboplatin) works to shrink tumors in patients with HER2 positive endometrial serous carcinoma or carcinosarcoma. Trastuzumab and pertuzumab are monoclonal antibodies and forms of targeted therapy that attach to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of tumor cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab or pertuzumab attach to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the tumor cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. Hyaluronidase is an endoglycosidase. It helps to keep pertuzumab and trastuzumab in the body longer, so that these medications will have a greater effect. Hyaluronidase also allows trastuzumab and trastuzumab/pertuzumab to be given by injection under the skin and shortens their administration time compared to trastuzumab or pertuzumab alone. Paclitaxel is a taxane and in a class of medications called antimicrotubule agents. It stops cancer cells from growing and dividing and may kill them. Carboplatin is in a class of medications known as platinum-containing compounds. It works in a way similar to the anticancer drug cisplatin, but may be better tolerated than cisplatin. Carboplatin works by killing, stopping or slowing the growth of tumor cells. Giving Herceptin Hylecta or Phesgo in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin may shrink the tumor and prevent the cancer from coming back in patients with HER2 positive endometrial serous carcinoma or carcinosarcoma.

SWOG S1823

This trial studies whether the blood marker micro ribonucleic acid (miRNA) 371 can predict the chance of cancer returning in patients with germ cell cancers. Studying samples of blood from patients with germ cell cancers in the laboratory may help doctors predict how likely the cancer will come back. Patients must have a new diagnosis of a germ cell tumor confirmed pathologically or serologically (diagnostic elevation of HCG/AFP); all primary sites, stages, histological subtypes of germ cell tumor are eligible