AGCT1531

This phase III trial studies how well active surveillance, bleomycin, etoposide, carboplatin or cisplatin work in treating pediatric and adult patients with germ cell tumors. Active surveillance may help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors after their tumor is removed. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The trial studies whether carboplatin or cisplatin is the preferred chemotherapy to use in treating germ cell tumors.

AGCT1532

Bleomycin, Etoposide, Cisplatin (BEP) administered 3-weekly x 4 remains standard 1st line chemotherapy for intermediate- and poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumours (GCTs). Cure rates are over 90% for good-risk disease, 85% with intermediate-risk, and about 70% for poor-risk disease. Previous strategies to improve first-line chemotherapy have failed to improve cure rates and were more toxic than BEP. New strategies are needed for patients with intermediate and poor-risk disease. BEP is accelerated by cycling Cisplatin and etoposide 2-weekly instead of 3-weekly. The Australian and New Zealand Urogenital and Prostate Cancer Trials Group (ANZUP) is conducting a trial comparing accelerated BEP with standard BEP. The aim of this study is to determine if accelerated BEP is superior to standard BEP as first-line chemotherapy for intermediate and poor risk metastatic GCTs. Primary arising in testis, ovary, retro-peritoneum, or mediastinum

Alliance A031701

This phase II trial studies how well gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin work in treating patients with invasive bladder urothelial cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.

Alliance A031702

This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib works in combination with nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with rare genitourinary (GU) tumors that have spread to other places in the body. Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib, nivolumab, and ipilimumab may work better in treating patients with genitourinary tumors that have no treatment options compared to giving cabozantinib, nivolumab, or ipilimumab alone.

Alliance A031704

This phase III trial studies how well nivolumab and ipilimumab, followed by nivolumab versus cabozantinib and nivolumab, work in treating patients with renal cell cancer that is untreated and has spread to other parts of the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cabozantinib, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known how well cabozantinib and nivolumab work in treating patients with untreated renal cell cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.

Alliance A031803

This phase II trial studies the effect of adding pembrolizumab to gemcitabine in treating patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer whose cancer does not respond to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, work in different ways by stopping the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the patient’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Adding pembrolizumab to gemcitabine may delay the return of BCG-unresponsive bladder cancer for longer period compared to gemcitabine alone.

Alliance A031901

This phase III trial compares survival in urothelial cancer patients who stop immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment after being treated for about a year to those patients who continue treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, durvalumab, pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Stopping immune checkpoint inhibitors early may still make the tumor shrink and patients may have similar survival rates as the patients who continue treatment. Stopping treatment early may also lead to fewer treatment-related side effects, an improvement in mental health, and a lower cost burden to patients.

Alliance A031902

This randomized, placebo-controlled phase III trial is evaluating the benefit of rucaparib and enzalutamide combination therapy versus enzalutamide alone for the treatment of men with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and has become resistant to testosterone-deprivation therapy (castration-resistant). Enzalutamide helps fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of testosterone by the tumor cells for growth. Poly adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, such as rucaparib, fight prostate cancer by prevent tumor cells from repairing their DNA. Giving enzalutamide and rucaparib may make patients live longer or prevent their cancer from growing or spreading for a longer time, or both. It may also help doctors learn if a mutation in any of the homologous recombination DNA repair genes is helpful to decide which treatment is best for the patient.

Alliance A032001

This phase III trial compares the effect of adding cabozantinib to avelumab versus avelumab alone in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib and avelumab together may further shrink the cancer or prevent it from returning/progressing.

Alliance A032002

This phase II trial compares the effect of adding radiation therapy to an immunotherapy drug called atezolizumab vs. atezolizumab alone in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). The addition of radiation to immunotherapy may shrink the cancer, but it could also cause side effects. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a type of radiation therapy that uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. This method uses special equipment to position a patient and precisely deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method may kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and may cause less damage to normal tissue than conventional radiation therapy. The combination of atezolizumab and radiation therapy may be more efficient in killing tumor cells.

ECOG-ACRIN EA8171

This phase II trial studies how well multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) works in evaluating cancer stage and helping treatment planning in patients with prostate cancer. Multiparametric MRI may be useful for evaluating the type of cancer in finding aggressive disease.

ECOG-ACRIN EA8183

This phase III trial compares the effect of adding darolutamide to ADT versus ADT alone after surgery for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer. ADT reduces testosterone levels in the blood. Testosterone is a hormone made mainly in the testes and is needed to develop and maintain male sex characteristics, such as facial hair, deep voice, and muscle growth. It also plays role in prostate cancer development. Darolutamide blocks the actions of the androgens (e.g. testosterone) in the tumor cells and in the body. Giving darolutamide with ADT may work better in eliminating or reducing the size of the cancer and/or prevent it from returning compared to ADT alone in patients with prostate cancer.

ECOG-ACRIN EA8184

This phase II trial studies how well green tea catechins work in preventing progression of prostate cancer from a low risk stage to higher risk stages in men who are on active surveillance. Green tea catechins may stabilize prostate cancer and lower the chance of prostate growing.

ECOG-ACRIN EA8185

This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy alone works compared to chemotherapy and radiation therapy plus MEDI4736 (durvalumab) immunotherapy in treating bladder cancer which has spread to the lymph nodes. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with durvalumab may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy and radiation therapy with the addition of durvalumab may work better in helping tumors respond to treatment compared to chemotherapy and radiation therapy alone.

ECOG-ACRIN EA8191

This phase III trial compares the addition of apalutamide, with or without targeted radiation therapy, to standard of care treatment versus standard of care treatment alone in patients with prostate cancer biochemical recurrence (a rise in the blood level of prostate-specific antigen [PSA] after treatment with surgery or radiation). Diagnostic procedures, such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), may help doctors look for cancer that has spread to the pelvis. Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Apalutamide may help fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of androgens by the tumor cells. Targeted radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors that have spread. This trial may help doctors determine if using PET/CT results to deliver more tailored treatment (i.e., adding apalutamide, with or without targeted radiation therapy, to standard of care treatment) works better than standard of care treatment alone in patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer.

ECOG-ACRIN EA8192

This phase III trial compares the effect of adding durvalumab to chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone before surgery in treating patients with upper urinary tract cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and gemcitabine work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Durvalumab in combination with chemotherapy before surgery may enhance the shrinking of the tumor compared to chemotherapy alone.

NRG-GU002

This randomized phase II / III trial studies docetaxel, antiandrogen therapy, and radiation therapy to see how well it works compared with antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy alone in treating patients with prostate cancer that has been removed by surgery. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cells. Antihormone therapy may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy with or without docetaxel after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells.

NRG-GU008

This phase III trial studies whether adding apalutamide, abiraterone acetate, and prednisone to the usual treatment improves outcome in patients with lymph node positive prostate cancer after surgery. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-ray to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Androgens, or male sex hormones, can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Drugs, such as apalutamide, may help stop or reduce the growth of prostate cancer cell growth by blocking the attachment of androgen to its receptors on cancer cells, a mechanism similar to stopping the entrance of a key into its lock. Abiraterone acetate blocks some of the enzymes needed for androgen production and may cause the death of prostate cancer cells dependent on androgen for their growth. Prednisone may help abiraterone acetate work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drug. Adding apalutamide and abiraterone acetate with prednisone to the usual hormone therapy and radiation therapy after surgery may stabilize prostate cancer and prevent it from spreading and extend time without disease spreading compared to the usual approach.

NRG-GU010

This phase III trial uses the Decipher risk score to guide intensification (for higher Decipher gene risk) or de-intensification (for low Decipher gene risk) of treatment to better match therapies to an individual patient's cancer aggressiveness. The Decipher risk score evaluates a prostate cancer tumor for its potential for spreading. In patients with low risk scores, this trial compares radiation therapy alone to the usual treatment of radiation therapy and hormone therapy (androgen deprivation therapy). Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays or particles to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Androgen deprivation therapy blocks the production or interferes with the action of male sex hormones such as testosterone, which plays a role in prostate cancer development. Giving radiation treatment alone may be the same as the usual approach in controlling the cancer and preventing it from spreading, while avoiding the side effects associated with hormonal therapy. In patients with higher Decipher gene risk, this trial compares the addition of darolutamide to usual treatment radiation therapy and hormone therapy, to usual treatment. Darolutamide blocks the actions of the androgens (e.g. testosterone) in the tumor cells and in the body. The addition of darolutamide to the usual treatment may better control the cancer and prevent it from spreading.

NRG-GU011

This phase II trial tests whether relugolix and radiation therapy works to shrink tumors in patients with prostate cancer that has spread in a limited way to 1 to 5 other parts of the body (oligometastatic). Testosterone can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Relugolix lowers the amount of testosterone made by the body. This may help stop the growth of tumor cells that need testosterone to grow. Giving relugolix with radiation therapy may help lower the chance of prostate cancer growing or spreading.

NRG-GU012

This phase II trial tests whether the addition of radiation to the primary tumor, typically given with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), in combination with standard of care immunotherapy improves outcomes in patients with renal cell cancer that is not recommended for surgery and has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Radiation therapy uses high energy photons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method may kill tumor cells with fewer doses of radiation over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, ipilimumab, avelumab, and pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Axitinib, cabozantinib, and lenvatinib are in a class of medications called antiangiogenic agents. They work by stopping the formation of blood vessels that bring oxygen and nutrients to tumor. This may slow the growth and spread of tumor. Giving SABR in combination with standard of care immunotherapy may help shrink or stabilize the cancer in patients with renal cell cancer.

NRG-GU009

This phase III trial compares less intense hormone therapy and radiation therapy to usual hormone therapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with high risk prostate cancer and low gene risk score. This trial also compares more intense hormone therapy and radiation therapy to usual hormone therapy and radiation therapy in patients with high risk prostate cancer and high gene risk score. Abiraterone acetate may help fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of testosterone made by the body. Apalutamide may help fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of androgen by the tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving a shorter hormone therapy treatment may work the same at controlling prostate cancer compared to the usual 24 month hormone therapy treatment in patients with low gene risk score. Adding abiraterone acetate and apalutamide to the usual treatment may increase the length of time without prostate cancer spreading as compared to the usual treatment in patients with high gene risk score.

SWOG S1802

This phase III trial studies whether the addition of definitive treatment (radiation or surgical removal) of the primary tumor to standard systemic therapy for patients with prostate cancer, may help prevent the cancer from the spreading to other parts of their body. Removing the prostate by either surgery or radiation therapy in addition to standard systemic therapy for prostate cancer may lower the chance of the cancer growing or spreading.

SWOG S1806

This phase III trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy work with or without atezolizumab in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, cisplatin, fluorouracil and mitomycin-C, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving atezolizumab with radiation therapy and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer compared to radiation therapy and chemotherapy without atezolizumab.

SWOG S1823

This trial studies whether the blood marker micro ribonucleic acid (miRNA) 371 can predict the chance of cancer returning in patients with germ cell cancers. Studying samples of blood from patients with germ cell cancers in the laboratory may help doctors predict how likely the cancer will come back. Patients must have a new diagnosis of a germ cell tumor confirmed pathologically or serologically (diagnostic elevation of HCG/AFP); all primary sites, stages, histological subtypes of germ cell tumor are eligible

SWOG S1931

This phase III trial compares the effect of adding surgery to a standard of care immunotherapy-based drug combination versus a standard of care immunotherapy-based drug combination alone in treating patients with kidney cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, ipilimumab, pembrolizumab, and avelumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Axitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Surgery to remove the kidney, called a nephrectomy, is also considered standard of care; however, doctors who treat kidney cancer do not agree on its benefits. It is not yet known if the addition of surgery to an immunotherapy-based drug combination works better than an immunotherapy-based drug combination alone in treating patients with kidney cancer.

SWOG S1937

This phase III trial compares the usual chemotherapy treatment to eribulin alone and to eribulin plus gemcitabine in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Chemotherapy drugs, such as eribulin, gemcitabine, docetaxel, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial aims to see whether adding eribulin to standard of care chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with metastatic urothelial cancer.

SWOG S2011

This phase II trial studies the effect of avelumab, gemcitabine and carboplatin before surgery compared with surgery alone in treating patients with muscle invasive bladder or upper urinary tract cancer who are not able to receive cisplatin therapy. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as gemcitabine and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving avelumab together with gemcitabine and carboplatin before surgery may work better in lowering the chance of muscle invasive urinary tract cancer growing or spreading, in patients who cannot receive cisplatin therapy compared to surgery alone.

SWOG S2200

This phase II trial tests whether cabozantinib with or without atezolizumab works to shrink tumors in patients with papillary kidney cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib with atezolizumab may prevent papillary kidney cancer from growing or spreading compared to cabozantinib alone.

Wake Forest WF-1802

The objective of this study is to examine how adenocarcinoma of the prostate treatment differentially affects African American men's ability to work and to describe and compare changes in work ability (as measured through self-reported global work ability item) reported by African American and white adenocarcinoma of the prostate survivors before treatment and 6 months after treatment completion. Participants will receive a $30, $20, and $20 gift card after administration of the first, second, and third Structured Questionnaires, respectively. Participants will receive gifts cards to a retailer such as Wal-Mart in electronic or physical format.