Alliance A041501

This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of inotuzumab ozogamicin and how well it works when given with frontline chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with chemotherapy may work better in treating young adults with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Alliance A061202

This randomized phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of pomalidomide and ixazomib when given together with dexamethasone and to see how well pomalidomide and dexamethasone with or without ixazomib works in treating patients with multiple myeloma that does not respond to treatment. Biological therapies, such as pomalidomide and dexamethasone, may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Ixazomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether pomalidomide and dexamethasone are more effective with or without ixazomib in treating multiple myeloma.

ECOG-ACRIN E1A11

This randomized phase III trial studies bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone to see how well they work compared to carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Bortezomib and carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Lenalidomide may help the immune system kill abnormal blood cells or cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone are more or less effective than carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma

ECOG-ACRIN NHLBI-MDS

This research trial collects tissue samples from and studies the history of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Collecting and storing patients' bone marrow, blood, eyebrow hairs, buccal swab, skin, or other tissues to be studied in the laboratory in the future may help doctors learn more about MDS and blood disorders that may lead to MDS. Collecting information about patients and the treatments they receive may allow doctors to better understand how MDS changes over time and this knowledge may lead to better ways to prevent, detect, and treat MDS in the future.

SWOG S1318 – Temporarily Closed

This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy or dasatinib, prednisone, and blinatumomab work in treating older patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, find cancer cells and help kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as prednisone, vincristine sulfate, methotrexate, and mercaptopurine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Dasatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving blinatumomab with combination chemotherapy or dasatinib and prednisone may kill more cancer cells.

SWOG S1612

This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well azacitidine with or without nivolumab or midostaurin, or decitabine and cytarabine alone work in treating older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, decitabine, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Midostaurin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving azacitidine with or without nivolumab or midostaurin, or decitabine and cytarabine alone may kill more cancer cells.